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Does your family know about the FREE lessons, quiz & games website for 7-14-year-old from UK Power Networks?

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A free website designed to help children stay safe around electricity has seen its visitor numbers rise by more than 90% in the past week.

UK Power Networks, who deliver electricity to 8.3million customers across the South East, East of England and London, hosts its educational website at http://powerup.ukpowernetworks.co.uk/powerup/en/.

Hundreds of families have logged on each day and a Facebook post about the site was shared more than 550 times.

The ‘Power Up’ website is packed with lessons for children aged 7-14 including fun games and quizzes as well as safety guidance on the potential dangers of electricity.

With schools closed because of the coronavirus, many parents are having to teach their children at home and the site, which includes lesson plans for teachers, is a great way to introduce electricity as a topic.


There are special sections for under-11s and over-11s with the older age group given more detail about how electricity reaches homes and how to stay safe around overhead power lines including a ‘spot the hazard’ game and a Power Up quiz.

Emma Palmer, who heads up safety communications at UK Power Networks, said:

“It’s nice to be able to share some good news at this difficult time for everybody. With so much home schooling taking place, Power Up has seen a significant rise in traffic and we have lots of fun resources there for parents and children to enjoy together.

“Because of the current travel restrictions due to coronavirus we haven’t been able to do our usual engagement with children in schools and at other events, so it’s fantastic that the information is still being used to help everyone to stay safe around electricity and we hope even more families will take advantage of it.”

Education

Crawley students to be given option to sit exams in next academic year

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The Department for Education has released further information around exams and grades following the earlier one this week that exams were cancelled.

They have also announced that students who wish to take their exams will be able to do so in the next academic year.

The exam regulator, Ofqual, and exam boards will work with teachers to provide grades to students whose exams have been cancelled this summer, following our actions to slow the spread of coronavirus.

This means ensuring GCSE, A and AS level students are awarded a grade which fairly reflects the work that they have put in. There will also be an option to sit an exam early in the next academic year for students who wish to. Ofqual will develop and set out a process that will provide a calculated grade to each student which reflects their performance as fairly as possible, and will work with the exam boards to ensure this is consistently applied for all students. The exam boards will be asking teachers, who know their students well, to submit their judgement about the grade that they believe the student would have received if exams had gone ahead.

To produce this, teachers will take into account a range of evidence and data including performance on mock exams and non-exam assessment – clear guidance on how to do this fairly and robustly this will be provided to schools and colleges. The exam boards will then combine this information with other relevant data, including prior attainment, and use this information to produce a calculated grade for each student, which will be a best assessment of the work they have put in.

The aim is to provide these calculated grades to students before the end of July. In terms of a permanent record, the grades will be indistinguishable from those provided in other years. The DoE says they will also aim to ensure that the distribution of grades follows a similar pattern to that in other years, so that this year’s students do not face a systematic disadvantage as a consequence of these extraordinary circumstances.

The Department for Education said:

“We recognise that some students may nevertheless feel disappointed that they haven’t been able to sit their exams.

If they do not believe the correct process has been followed in their case they will be able to appeal on that basis.

In addition, if they do not feel their calculated grade reflects their performance, they will have the opportunity to sit an exam at the earliest reasonable opportunity, once schools are open again.

Students will also have the option to sit their exams in summer 2021.”

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