Connect with us

Health & Wellbeing

Crawley care manager shares how family tragedy led her to care for others

Published

on

Hilary joined Housing 21 seven years ago after feeling compelled to enter a career in care following the sad deaths of her parents and brother, who had all required care themselves.

Tragically, Hilary’s brother who had progressive MS was mis-medicated and as a result passed away suddenly. Her brother’s passing devastated Hilary’s mum, who died shortly after. Hilary’s dad had passed away a few years before in a Dementia Care Home.

Hilary originally started her care work in the evenings, administering medication and settling residents for bed.

She did this while still working in retail during the day, which she had done for 24 years. After realising that working two jobs was too much, Hilary decided to follow her heart and apply for a full-time role at Housing 21’s Walstead Court.

Hilary reflects:

“I wish I had known about Housing 21 when I left school. Considering I had never done anything like care work, the application process was extremely easy and the managers were so helpful and encouraging, they made me feel comfortable about my lack of experience and told me how much they were looking forward to teaching me. After five years of working two jobs, I realised I was extremely tired of working in retail and nothing about the role was fulfilling, I was unhappy and Walstead Court was where I wanted to be.

“I wish I had known about Housing 21 when I left school. Considering I had never done anything like care work, the application process was extremely easy and the managers were so helpful and encouraging, they made me feel comfortable about my lack of experience and told me how much they were looking forward to teaching me. After five years of working two jobs, I realised I was extremely tired of working in retail and nothing about the role was fulfilling, I was unhappy and Walstead Court was where I wanted to be.

“Without my role at Housing 21, I would have fallen apart. I started soon after my brother’s death and never looked back. I felt a need to keep people safe and ensure they were given the correct care they required by someone they could trust. I poured myself into the job, the residents and the care; I wouldn’t have survived without it.”

When asked what her favourite thing is about the role, Hilary says:

“Everything. Seeing the residents smile and giving you a hug is so rewarding. There’s nowhere else I would rather be, I may as well live at Walstead Court, it has such a positive effect on your mindset.

“We’re a small court and Care Team but we are so close, the team really makes the job so much easier. I’m now an Assistant Care Manager, but I still choose to do my 10 hours of care work a week, which I love. The residents see my role as the singer, and that’s how I communicate with some of them. There is a lady at the court who has dementia and we’ve created a cup of tea song which we both sing every morning. I’m also a hairdresser, a companion, an escort to their hospital appointments and someone to chat to. It’s so much more than just personal care. The residents confide in you, you are like their family and for some, we’re the only family they have.

“We hold weekly activities such as karaoke and skittles and give the residents the chance to suggest events. We’re looking into joining up with a sister court so the residents can mix with each other and it gives them a chance to go on an outing.”

When asked if Hilary would recommend a career as a Care Worker with Housing 21 to others, she says:

“Of course, it’s so rewarding, it’s not your average 9-5 job as every day is different. You don’t feel like you’re at work, I feel like I’m off to see friends and family. I would never swap this absolutely amazing career for anything.”

Coronavirus

Urgent recruitment appeal for carers across West Sussex following surge in demand from care homes

Published

on

Local people who have lost their jobs due to the impact of coronavirus are being urged to come forward and apply for jobs in the care industry to support elderly and vulnerable residents.

Care homes and home care providers in West Sussex are anticipating a huge demand for their services as the outbreak continues.

A West Sussex County Council initiative called Proud to Care is targeting people from the travel, leisure, retail and hospitality industries as they have the ideal skills and experience to succeed in care work.

Founder of Chichester based Guardian Angel Carers, Christina Handasyde Dick said:

“As a home care provider we are on a major recruitment drive at the moment, as we are providing essential services to vulnerable adults in their own home at this challenging time.

“We desperately want to support our local hospitals to discharge patients as efficiently as possible, and to be able to continue to support them in the comfort of their own home.

“People from all sorts of career backgrounds can make great carers, if you are a compassionate, professional and reliable individual that would love an incredibly rewarding role to support your local community, please help.”

The Proud To Care website – www.proudtocarewestsussex.com – has details of around 300 full-time and part-time positions available with care providers across West Sussex.

As well as supporting the care sector which helps some of our most vulnerable residents, the County Council also aims to support our local economy and those who have been affected by the impact on it by the coronavirus outbreak. 

Amanda Jupp, Cabinet Member for Adults and Health, said:

“This is a very difficult time for so many of us, particularly those who are vulnerable or live alone.  There are, no doubt, a number of people in the travel, leisure, hospitality or retail sectors who unfortunately may have lost their jobs due to the impact of the coronavirus outbreak.

“We would very much like to reach out to those people to help find them paid employment supporting some of the most vulnerable people in our community. By doing this we will not only increase the workforce in the care sector at this critical time but also help to support the local economy by keeping people in jobs.

“Many people will have transferable skills that make them well suited to working in care and I would urge them to help us by responding to one of the biggest challenges ever faced by the health and care sector.

“Protecting and caring for vulnerable people at this present time is our greatest priority.”

Care workers are classed as key workers and their safety and well-being and those that are being cared for is the highest priority. Anyone working in care will be trained and supported to make sure care is delivered safely and effectively. Interviews may take place over the phone or video and training may be done online, where possible.

Care work involves making sure vulnerable people feel safe are comfortable, by supporting with preparing their meals, washing, getting dressed and providing companionship. Anyone interested can apply for jobs online through the website and contact the Proud to Care team who can answer any questions and give guidance. Visit www.proudtocarewestsussex.com/covid-19/ or email proudtocare@westsussex.gov.uk

Continue Reading

Trending