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78% in South East admit they could do more to be kinder, says British Red Cross survey

South East residents believe doing just one kind thing can make the UK a better place.

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The majority of people believe we can all be kinder to each other, according to a survey of the UK public for the British Red Cross.

The survey of 2,005 UK adults, 275 in the South East was carried out by Opinium for the British Red Cross between 3 – 7 May 2019.

Nearly four in five people surveyed admitted they themselves could do more to be kinder to others, with a staggering 99% agreeing that if we all did one kind thing a day, the UK would be a better place.

Preventing people from feeling lonely ranked top for the difference people would most like to make. Among the small acts of kindness people shared that had a big impact were:

  • A stranger at a petrol pump lending them 2p when they had no cash and were just over the £30 limit to use contactless
  • Friends who’d only ever met on Twitter sending another Twitter friend a box of goodies to cheer them up when they were ill
  • A neighbour nipping next door to re-plant a rose bush that had died, as a surprise
  • Coming home to a houseful of happy post-it note messages from a flatmate
  • Being met at the door with a… cheesecake after a particularly bad day at work

Alongside the survey, the British Red Cross is launching its One Kind Thing campaign, encouraging everyone in the UK to do something kind to support its vital work.

From donating money, time or unwanted clothes, to taking part in an event, the charity is inviting us all to choose ‘one kind thing’ to ensure its volunteers can keep connecting people in crisis with people’s kindness, across the UK and the world.

Executive Director for Communications and Advocacy at the British Red Cross, Zoë Abrams said:

“The British Red Cross connects people in crisis with people who want to help. We reach out when people need us most so they know they don’t have to face their challenges alone. These survey results show the UK public believe we can all manage to do one kind thing, and it doesn’t have to be grand scale to make a real difference.

“Even the simplest acts of kindness can start to remove some of the fear and anxiety we all feel when faced with adversity, however big or small. That’s as true in refugee camps thousands of miles away as it is on a street here in the UK.  It’s heartening to see how strongly people recognise that; now we must mobilise and empower one other to create a kinder nation.”

Clinical psychologist, Dr Sarah Davidson, heads up a team of British Red Cross staff and volunteers trained to support people wherever they are in the world when crisis hits.

“Increasingly we’re seeing how emotional support is as vital as water, food, shelter and cash, to help people start to recover. And kindness is at the heart of that because it connects us to each other. Whether you’ve lost your home, your relative or your livelihood, having another human being notice your pain and be kind to you helps break through feelings of pain, loneliness and isolation.

“It may not change your situation immediately but it can reduce feelings of anxiety, depression and other mental health problems. It’s a two-way process. Whether you’re experiencing kindness or being kind, both of you feel valued and better able to cope.”

The British Red Cross offers practical and emotional support to people in crisis in the UK on average every four hours. From major disasters to looking after people who’ve lost their homes in a fire or flood, it sees every day how small acts of kindness can make a vast difference to how people cope.

Internationally, its volunteers support people in the face of natural disasters and epidemics, as well as those forced from their homes through hunger, poverty, and conflict. Very often those volunteers are victims of the same extreme circumstances themselves.

Find out more about the One Kind Thing campaign by searching online for ‘Red Cross One Kind Thing’. You can also get involved on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or Linked In, using the hashtag #OneKindThing.

Education

The happy faces of Crawley’s GCSE students

It’s smiles all round as the towns GCSE students celebrate another successful year with their results.

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From all areas of Crawley nervous students have been collecting their GCSE results this morning.

GCSE results show that there has been a slight increase in the number of pupils across West Sussex who have achieved passes in English and Maths.

Figures show that an average of 65.7% secured passes in both English and Maths, compared to 65.4% in 2018.

Results in West Sussex are slightly lower than the average across England, Wales and Northern Ireland of 67.3% achieving passes in both English and Maths.

Most GCSE results in England are now being graded from 9 to 1, with 7 the equivalent to an A and 4 a C grade.

Early figures provided by West Sussex schools and academies combined show:
• The proportion of West Sussex students achieving the pass level Grade 4 (equivalent of a C grade) has gone up by 0.3%

• Schools’ Attainment 8 scores (the average of their students’ grades across eight key subjects) have also gone up from 37.1% to 44.5%, an increase of 7.4%.

Richard Burrett, West Sussex County Council Cabinet Member for Education and Skills, said:

“I know pupils across the county, as well as teachers and school staff, have worked very hard during the past two years. I’m delighted that this has led to an increase in this year’s pass rate.

“I pass on my congratulations to those who have received their results and are now planning their next move, whether that is further study, employment or training.”


Students who did not achieve the grades they wanted are encouraged to speak to their school or college about the opportunities still available to them.

The results are provisional until the Department for Education issues more detailed examination results later this year and the figures have been confirmed.

Hazelwick School were very happy with the Chair of Governors saying how proud she was of the students hard work.

Kirsty Armstrong (pictured with Headteacher, Ann Fearon – 7 grade 9s , 2 grade 8s)

Headteacher, Ann Fearon, said:

“Our students should be immensely proud of their achievements and I congratulate them for their effort, commitment and resilience. The new ‘9-1’ GCSEs in all subjects continue to present a real challenge to all schools and I am delighted with how well our students have risen to that challenge. I would also like to thank Hazelwick staff and parents/carers for the fantastic support provided for our students.  Hazelwick School is a school to be proud of.  We are ambitious for our students and that ambition is making a positive difference to their futures.”

At Thomas Bennett Community College there was extra reason to celebrate after the Schools turbulent past years. But now the school has seen a massive rise in student results.

Headteacher Stuart Smith said:

“Congratulations to all of the Year 11 students for a set of fantastic results. They are a direct reflection of the hard work and dedication put into your studies this year and through your time as a student at Thomas Bennett.  I’d like to say a big thank you to staff for their commitment in ensuring that students were well prepared.  Also to parents and carers for working with the school and supporting students at home.  I wish all of the students the very best of luck in the next stage of their learning.”

Over at the Gatwick School it was their first Year 11 cohort who took their exams.

Head of School Mark Roessler stated:

“This year The Gatwick School had its first Year 11 cohort sitting their GCSE exams, and with less than 50 students sitting these exams, I am extremely proud of how they have risen to the challenge. They have led the way for all the other year groups who will follow them and I am delighted at how well our students have achieved; they are a credit to their families, to our school and, most importantly, to themselves. I am proud of my excellent staff who have supported and dedicated themselves to our students. They pride themselves on going above and beyond expectations on a daily basis for all students. I am also grateful to our families for their faith in The Gatwick School and for the support they have shown throughout the incredible journey that we have been on over the last 5 years. As Head of School, I am determined that ‘All Can Achieve’ at The Gatwick School. We provide students not only with the academic grounding that allows access to further education and employment, but an extremely high level of pastoral care and support, which enables all students to develop, both in self-confidence and in maintaining a strong moral compass, which is just as important as academic success”. 

At St Wilfrids there was more success with a high number of students achieving at least one grade 9.

Mr Ferry (Headteacher) said:

“We are seeing a lot of happy faces this morning and I am immensely proud of all of our students. The new examinations require students to cover much more detail than in the past and they have worked incredibly hard over the last two years. Make no mistake, the grades they are receiving today have been hard earned”.

Over at Ifield Community College Head teacher Rob Corbett paid tribute to the success of his pupils saying:

“ICC continues to go from strength to strength and the hard work of staff and students has paid off in our GCSE results this year. The school, judged good a year ago and expanding due to its’ popularity, is celebrating the success of its year eleven students.

We are extremely proud of the success of all of our students who showed the tenacity and dedication to succeed in the reformed qualifications.”

Ifield Community College GCSE students.

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