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Over half of diabetics have been treated for mental health problems, says new study

Diabetes week runs from 11th – 17th June. It aims to encourage people to come together to share stories about, and raise awareness of, diabetes.

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An independent study of people living with type 1 and 2 diabetes, by Censuswide, commissioned by Ieso Digital Health, the UK’s leading provider of online therapy highlights the scale of mental health problems affecting those living with this chronic condition.

This study, compiled by Ieso Digital Health, the UK’s largest provider of online CBT, shows that people living with diabetes are more likely to experience mental health problems compared with the general population.

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About one in four adults in the UK will suffer from a mental health condition each year ii; however, the Ieso study found that over half of patients with diabetes (51%) have sought treatment for stress, anxiety, depression or other mental health problems. Three quarters (75%) of young adults (16-34) believe their mental health has been negatively affected by their diabetes.

According to Sarah Bateup, Chief Clinical Officer, Ieso Digital Health:

“Mental health should be considered an integral part of on-going diabetes care. We need to ensure a multifaceted approach including comprehensive assessment for mental health problems, educating patients to recognise stress and mental health problems and encouraging self‐care.

Providing effective mental health interventions such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can help patients to address the emotional and behavioural aspects of living with a life-long condition such as diabetes.”

Mental health issues can make it more difficult for diabetes sufferers to alter their diet and lifestyle to comply with medical treatment programmes.

Mental health issues linked to diabetes include feelings of loss, stress, anger, panic attacks, mood disorders, depression, anxiety and eating disorders. A depressed person is less likely to adhere to their diabetes medication or monitoring regimens which are necessary for effective management of diabetes, resulting in poor glycaemic control. Phobic symptoms or anxieties related to self-injection of insulin and self-monitoring of blood glucose are common, resulting in further emotional distress. Stress and depression are known to elevate blood glucose levels, even if medication is taken regularly iv.

Around 700 people get diagnosed with diabetes every day in the UK. That’s the equivalent of one person every two minutes.

Diagnosed with diabetes? Call to treat the whole patient, not just the physical symptoms.

Almost half (46%) of people believe that better awareness would help detect stress and mental health issues, while 43% think discussions of mental health within diabetes-specific appointments would help and that clearer advice from medical bodies would help.

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Charity

Crawley School raises an incredible £13,250 for local charity

Oriel High School students raised the huge sum through a charity walk.

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Oriel High School students chose The Olive Tree Cancer Support Centre which is attached to Crawley Hospital as their chosen charity for their sponsored walk this year.

The students managed to raise an astounding £13,250.

Alyson Smith, Fundraising manager for Olive Tree Cancer Support was presented with a cheque with more money still coming in.

Alyson said:

“As a small charity this is such amazing news to us. The Olive Tree Cancer Support Centre is a small, independent charity based in Crawley which has provided free support, advice, friendship and therapies to thousands of people in the local area and is a hugely valuable and much appreciated resource.

The Olive Tree, which began as a small cancer support group over 21 years ago in Crawley, provides a haven: somewhere to go and be with people who understand and can help. Our team of 85 volunteers offers free information, advice and therapeutic care to support all those affected by cancer from the point of diagnosis, through treatment and beyond. The Olive Tree supports the friends, families and carers as well as the individual experiencing cancer.”

The charity offer complementary and emotional support therapies. They say the complementary therapies can help to reduce stress, alleviate the side effects of cancer treatments and enhance feelings of well-being. They also offer acupuncture, aromatherapy, massage, reflexology, craniosacral therapy and Reiki.

Their emotional support is offered through counselling, art counselling, coaching, hypnotherapy and mindfulness workshops and they also run several support groups, which provide an informal environment for people to come together and support.

The charity also point out that their range of services is continually evolving and currently includes yoga, singing workshops, and a wig scheme.

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